everyone and anything

We Give You Thanks Christian Worship Background

“In the Kingdom of God everyone is welcome and anything is possible.”

I’ve repeated (and contemplated) that statement a number of times since the beginning of the New Year.

The first week it just sort of came out.

It was Sunday.

I was bringing the first sermon of 2016 to a close.

And, boom!

There it was.

It wasn’t planned.

I did’t have it in my notes.

It hadn’t crossed my mind until the moment it came out of my mouth.

“In the Kingdom of God everyone is welcome and anything is possible.”

The Kingdom in inclusive, not exclusive. Everyone is welcome.

Right?

I mean we believe that to be a valid statement.

Correct?

And in the Kingdom (the reign and rule of God) anything is possible.

Isn’t it?

Do you agree with me on that?

No matter who you are, where you come from, the guilt of your past life, the burden of your present circumstance, the anxiety of the future, God is the God of transformation. He’s the God who creates beauty out of ashes. Life out of death. Light out of darkness. He’s in the making all things new business. It’s what He does.

“In the Kingdom of God everyone is welcome and anything is possible.”

Is it a true statement?

Satan whispers in our ears that it’s not true. It’s not valid. It’s not real.

And so, maybe the question we should ask is not: Is the statement true?

(Because it is!)

Perhaps a better question is: Do you believe it to be true?

(Do I believe it to be true?)

Because enveloped within the answer to that question lies divine reality, purpose, blessing, and peace.

“In the Kingdom of God everyone is welcome and anything is possible.”

Glory to God!

Jason

stealing joy

joy

“The one who has been forgiven little loves little” (Luke 7:47).

What is our Savior communicating to you in these nine words?

Jesus is in the home of Simon the Pharisee. The religious leader has gone out of his way to set the stage. Perhaps simply to gain a better understanding of what this proposed prophet from Nazareth is about. Maybe to make himself look good in front of his cronies by being the momentary big man on campus. Whether from false motives or pure, the fact is, the Christ has agreed to come.

But “when a woman who had lived a sinful life” is overwhelmed, simply by being in the presence of Jesus, crying as she is so humbled, overjoyed, as to be so blessed as to serve Him, Simon the host quickly turns into Simon the joy-stealer. “If this man were a prophet, He would know… she is a sinner” (V39).

“The one who has been forgiven little loves little” (Luke 7:47).

Have you been forgiven a lot or a little?

Are you sure that’s the perception others have of you?

If we view God as harsh and judgmental, guess what sort of lens we view others through? Exactly. If we see ourselves as somehow deserving of being in His presence, or of forgiveness, or of salvation, guess how we see others whom we do not deem as worthy or as orthodox as we are? (Do you sense a little sarcasm?)

What if you and I made a definitive decision today, that no matter what, that’s simply not how we’re going to be?

“The one who has been forgiven little loves little” (Luke 7:47).

And what about the one who has been forgiven much?

I’d say the one who has been forgiven much, refuses to steal another’s joy in the Lord.

Glory to God!

Jason