2016 “must reads”

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In recent years, as the end of December approaches and the year winds down, I enjoy thinking back over the previous twelve months and considering influential works along the way. Sometimes I intentionally read for sermons and classes and lectures. At other times I choose to read what I read because of the current book I’m working on. However this year, I’ve read a lot just for me. Yes, the knowledge gained finds its way into other areas. But for most of my reading in 2016, much has been simply for the enjoyment and the betterment of my walk with the Lord.

Here are a few I’d recommend if you’re looking for the same:

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learning_to_walk_in_the_dark-330How did darkness become a synonym for everything wicked, sinister, or wrong?

Barbara Brown Taylor’s “Learning to Walk in the Dark” is a wonderfully enlightening book (pun intended). Taylor is increasingly uncomfortable with our tendency to associate all that is good with lightness and all that is evil and dangerous with darkness. She asks, “Doesn’t God work in the nighttime as well?”

In “Learning to Walk in the Dark,” Taylor asks us to put aside our fears and anxieties and to explore all that God has to teach us “in the dark.”

Through darkness we find courage, we understand the world in new ways, and we feel God’s presence around us, guiding us through things seen and unseen. Often, it is while we are in the dark that we grow the most.

She writes, “Darkness is shorthand for anything that scares me…. I have learned things in the dark that I could have never learned in the light.”

Her book “An Altar in the World: A Geography of Faith” is another you ought to consider as well.

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31ishk-jxpl-_ux250_This year I decided to invest in rereading Eugene Peterson’s five book series “Conversations in Spiritual Theology” which includes:

“Christ Plays in Ten Thousand Places: A Conversation in Spiritual Theology” (2005)

“Eat This Book: A Conversation in the Art of Spiritual Reading” (2006)

“The Jesus Way: A Conversation on the Ways that Jesus is the Way” (2007)

“Tell It Slant: A Conversation on the Language of Jesus in His Stories and Prayers” (2008)

and “Practice Resurrection: A Conversation on Growing Up in Christ” (2010)

I first read each in the series as they we’re initially released into the wild. But they’ve set on my shelf for years. What a blessing to reread this series again!

No need for a seminary education. Simply devour the contents of each of these volumes.

Also, if you’ve not watched Eugene Peterson’s conversation with U2’s Bono (as if there’s another) via Fuller Theological Seminary you ought to check it out. Two of my favorite people.

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41domrv4ifl-_sx331_bo1204203200_Two books that I believe could be read together in regard to an ongoing Calvinism/Reformed and Arminian/Free Will conversation are “Young, Restless, and Reformed” by Collin Hansen and “Young, Restless, and No Longer Reformed” by Austin Fischer.

Both are written independently from one other. Neither collaborates with the other. But if you’re like me you have friends who are fall into one theology or another, or are somewhere in between. Seeking to understand where another is coming from, especially with those whom we differ, is far too often not our course of action. Shame on us!

Whether Reformed or Arminian, Hyper-Calvinist or absolutely Remonstrant to the core, faith should have nothing to fear from criticism.

(“For Calvinism” by Michael Horton and “Against Calvinism” by Roger Olson are two others that I’d recommend along these lines. See previous post.

Whereas Hansen and Fischer write their volumes completely independent of one another. Horton and Olson are friends and colleagues who not only love and respect one another, they write the forwards for one another’s book!)

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2751848_2936074_1477624764Tiersa ordered me an autographed copy of Brandon Hatmaker’s “A Mile Wide: Trading a Shallow Religion for a Deeper Faith.”

The call is transformation from an anemic spiritual life based upon a limited understanding of God, into a faith of true depth, intimacy, and power.

Hatmaker explores eight essentials of Christianity: the Gospel, identity, Scripture, discipleship, Kingdom, mission, community, and justice. Along the way he introduces practical applications that tap into the richer life Christ has promised, individually and as a community.

He writes: “God wants more than simply to save us: He’s also determined to transform us, restore us, and use us to reveal the coming of His kingdom right here, right now.”

“Barefoot Church” is another book of his from a couple of years ago that I really enjoyed as well.

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MartinI’ve found both when it comes to scholarly work, and in regard to the practice of spiritual disciplines, I’ve learned a lot from Jesuits. From Ignatius (the original Jesuit) to Pope Francis – humility, simplicity, and obedience are qualities that draw me to the Society of Jesus.

“Becoming Who You Are: Insights on the True Self from Thomas Merton and Other Saints” by James Martin SJ is a journey of fidelity and commitment to the Kingdom.

In this short book, Martin builds upon the discovery of the “true self” that Merton, Mother Theresa, Nouwen and many others have sought to live out and unveil.

As Merton describes, “The shedding of the grave clothes.”

Who we are in Christ.

Our identity and purpose.

Only when we lose ourselves do we find our true self.

Seems like our Lord said something along those lines….

I’ve read only a few books from James Martin SJ’s pen.

Peterson, Wright, and Keller – Merton, Nouwen and Rohr – Lewis and Tozer – Willard and Foster –  those are some of my “go-to’s.”

Martin may soon be on the list.

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There you have it.

The 2016 “must reads.”

Most years I’ll post the top five.

This year there are a few more than that for your consideration.

Glory to God!

Jason

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